Alcohol- and drug-related visits to hospital emergency departments
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Alcohol- and drug-related visits to hospital emergency departments 1992 National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey by Cheryl Nelson

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Published by [U.S. Dept. of Health and Human Services, Public Health Service, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, National Center for Health Statistics in [Hyattsville, Md.] (6525 Belcrest Rd., Hyattsville 20782) .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Ambulatory medical care -- United States -- Statistics.,
  • Drug utilization -- United States -- Statistics.,
  • Drinking of alcoholic beverages -- United States -- Statistics.

Book details:

Edition Notes

Other titlesAlcohol and drug related visits to hospital emergency departments.
Statementby Cheryl R. Nelson and Barbara J. Stussman.
SeriesDHHS publication -- no. (PHS) 94-1250., Advance data from vital and health statistics of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention/National Center for Health Statistics -- no. 251., Advance data from vital and health statistics of the National Center for Health Statistics -- no. 251.
ContributionsStussman, Barbara J., National Center for Health Statistics (U.S.).
The Physical Object
Pagination16 p. :
Number of Pages16
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18067535M

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Unfortunately, many of these studies have excluded patients seeking medical attention in the emergency department (ED) but not requiring hospital . Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits •May Page 1 Drug-Related Hospital Emergency Room Visits National estimates on drug-related visits to hospital emergency departments (ED) are obtained from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN),1,2 a public health surveillance system managed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services. National estimates on drug-related visits to hospital emergency departments (ED) are obtained from the Drug Abuse Warning Network (DAWN),1, 2 a public health surveillance system managed by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). DAWN data* are based on a national.   Alcohol misuse–related ED visits are an important indicator of the public health burden of alcohol use among adolescents and young adults. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project (HCUP) Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) 4 can be used to estimate trends in ED visits involving underage .

  Alcohol consumption continues to be a significant contributing factor to hospital admissions and deaths from a diverse range of conditions. Latest Public Health England (PHE) Local Alcohol Profiles for England data1 show that alcohol-related admissions during the year / increased to per admission episodes as compared with / Author: Fiona Wisniacki. Excel file with national estimates, rates, relative standard errors, trends and confidence intervals for all drug-related emergency department (ED) visits, covering File includes all drug-related ED visits that are reportable to DAWN without regard for the reason for the visit or the specific drugs involved. It includes visits involving all forms of drug misuse or abuse plus visits. Emergency Department Visits for Substance Abuse The National Hospital Care Survey (NHCS) collects information on emergency department (ED) visits in the. United States, including those resulting from substance misuse or abuse, adverse reactions to medications. The rise in emergency room visits due to alcohol is unsurprising in at least one sense, White says. More than two-thirds of Americans over the age of 17 (more than million people) drank alcohol at least once in , according to statistics from the Center for Behavioral Health Statistics and Quality.

Globally alcohol related emergency calls are growing at an exponential rate than overall emergency visits and signify a rising burden on hospital .   Healthy People , 1 the national health promotion and disease prevention agenda, cites reducing alcohol-related emergency department (ED) visits as 1 of its objectives for this decade. Indeed, US public health officials recognize that alcohol misuse is a major public health issue faced by our nation and poses a significant burden on hospital by: For the most part, rates have remained somewhat steady, peaking in and slowly dropping since then. Trends in alcohol-related emergency department visits exist and are similar to trends in alcohol and drug-related visits. Nearly half of all alcohol-related visits were individuals between the ages of 45 and 5 SUMMARY OF TRENDS Total drug and alcohol-related emergency department visits There w drug and alcohol-related emergency department visits among Maryland residents in From to , the age-adjusted rate for drug and alcohol-related emergency department visits increased by %.File Size: 4MB.